OSHA News & Safety Releases

  • 2019 Toolbox Talks #1 - How can we be safe around Equipment?

    Learn the hazards, results and what to look for.  There is an example of a recent fatality and steps in how to prevent these incidents.

    Read the full report   Click here

  • 2019 Toolbox Talks #2 - Incident

    Too often, we learn through the mistakes of others.  This 2015 incident explains what happened, and 10 things that could have prevented this incident THEN that we can use to prevent something like this NOW!

    Read the full report   Click here

  • 2019 Toolbox Talks #3 - Work Zone Driving

    Drive towards ZERO crashes - how our driving actions and habits cans save lives, including our own!

    Read the full report   Click here

  • 2019 Toolbox Talks #4 - Equipment and Falling Objects

    Being struck by falling objects is a leading source of construction fatalities.  Even a small object falling from a height can cause serious or fatal injuries.  Learn what has happened and how to prevent these incidents in the future.

    Read the full report   Click here

  • 2019 Toolbox Talks #5 - Working Safely Around and/or Securing Loads

    Suspended or moving Loads can be hazardous - types of hazards and their results are discussed, as well as ways to prevent these hazards in the future.

    Read the full report   Click here

  • 2019 Toolbox Talks #6 - Head Protection

    Without protecting our heads, we run the risk of losing EVERYTHING!  Hardhats are an important part of everyone's uniform in construction - with recommendations on how to wear your hardhat, what NOT to do - and why!  

    Read the full report   Click here

  • 2019 Toolbox Talks #7 - Runovers and Backovers

    OSHA continues to promote SAFETY through their Focus 4 Campaign.  This series includes Toolbox Talks.  Please READ These, and share them with the people in your office and sphere of influence.  Our goal is always to have everyone return home safely EVERY DAY!

    Too often we hear of children being hurt or killed by drivers unaware they are behind the car.  This happens too often on jobsites and is especially dangerous in road work.  6 precaution methods are outlined, plus 2 precautions that deal with clothing that can help visibility. 

     

    Read the full report   Click here

  • 2019 Toolbox Talks #8 - Road Work at Night

    Typically, our vision isn't as good at night  - and construction at night deals with tired drivers, glaring lights and less traffic which increases driving speeds!  We need to be sure we are visible to remain safe when working after dark.

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four 2019

    Dear Stakeholders and Partners:

    OSHA and our construction industry partners have initiated a “Focus Four Hazards” campaign throughout OSHA’s Region III jurisdiction.  We are reaching out to entities to assist us in promoting this campaign and to encourage you and your leadership to participate in this four month cooperative initiative being launched in March 2019.

    The goal of this campaign is to raise awareness in the recognition, evaluation, and control of these hazards.  As noted below, the Focus Four Hazards account for the vast majority of injuries and fatalities in the construction industry.

    Construction's "Fatal Four"

    Out of 5147* worker fatalities in private industry in calendar year 2017, 971 or 21% were in construction―that means that one in five worker deaths last year were in construction.

    The leading causes of worker deaths on construction sites were falls, followed by struck-by, electrocution, and caught-in/between. These "Fatal Four" hazards were responsible for well over half (60%) of the construction worker deaths in 2017*, according to BLS reports.

    • Falls — 381 out of 971 total deaths in construction in CY 2017 (39%)
    • Struck by Object - 80 (8%)
    • Electrocutions - 71 (7%)
    • Caught-in/between* - 50 (5%)

    *This category includes construction workers killed when caught-in or compressed by equipment or objects, and struck, caught, or crushed in collapsing structure, equipment, or material

    Eliminating these Four Hazards would save 582 workers' lives each year.

    We appreciate your assistance and support with this campaign.  We encourage you to provide feedback which will assist us in promoting future efforts and evaluating our impact in the construction industry.  All voluntary feedback may be sent to OSHA’s Pittsburgh Area Office, in care of Bob Carroll, Compliance Assistance Specialist at carroll.bob@dol.gov .

  • Safe + Sound Campaign for October 2018

    Subject: Hidden Hazards Are Lurking – Don’t Let Injuries and Illnesses Haunt Your Workplace!

     

    Take action to scare up hazards and find the best ways to control them.

    ·         Conduct safety walk-arounds to systematically identify and address workplace hazards.  Check out the Safe + Sound Campaign resources, Walk-Arounds for Safety Officers and Safety Walk-Arounds for Managers, for tips on making yours effective.

     

    ·         Hone your observation skills to identify and assess hazards in your workplace.  Watch the Campbell Institute’s webinar, Visual Literacy: How 'Learning to See' Benefits Occupational Safety.

     

    ·         Engage your workers and promote safety with challenges, contests, and competitions to find and fix hazards in your workplace.

     

    The Safe + Sound Campaign is organized by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, American Industrial Hygiene Association, American Society of Safety Professionals, The Center for Construction Research and Training, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, National Safety Council, and Voluntary Protection Programs Participants’ Association. For more information and additional resources to help you establish or improve your safety and health program, visit the Safe + Sound Campaign website.

     

  • OSHA Alliance Safety Update

     

    On Monday September 17 the IWEA Safety Committee held a roundtable discussion with Bob Carroll & Chris Robinson of the OSHA office in Pittsburgh. Hosted at the Master Builders' Association we were joined by representatives from Regular, Associate and Affiliate IWEA members as well as our labor partners at Iron Workers Local Union No. 3.

     

    During this discussion we covered a wide range of topics related to our 15-year Alliance Partnership with the OSHA Office including regional and national statistics and resources for education and training purposes and how the current and forecasted boom in this region creates additional challenges for safety from risk management to field level supervision and performance.

     

    3 KEY TAKEAWAYS _____________________________

     

    1.Communicate and keep open dialogue, the OSHA Compliance office and staff are available for proactive discussion which can often produce better outcomes and safer jobsites compared with an inspection/enforcement only relationship model.

     

    2. Available resources for training, the OSHA Compliance office provided updates stats and information related to "Most Frequently Cited Standards" specific to our industry for Steel Erection and Respirable Crystalline Silica. Additional Focus Four Toolbox talks which are promoted through OSHA each spring are available from IWEA.

     

    3. It requires a real partnership combining owners, contractors, field supervision, labor and risk management/safety resources to perform quality work safely in today's market.

     

    Additionally, OSHA provided information related to the 

    Susan Harwood Training Grants which provide training and education for workers and employers on workplace safety and health hazards, responsibilities and rights.

     

    Previously awarded Susan Harwood Training Grantees have made their materials available for others to utilize and continue the pursuit of safety training. 

     

    Find the available materials listed by topic here @

    OSHA Grant Materials By Topic

  • Construction Industry Opioid Awareness Week

    Join us for Construction Opioid Awareness Week - July 22-28, 2018

    Pennsylvania House of Representatives unanimously supported House Resolution 981, which declares the last full week of July as "Construction Opioid Awareness Week." Construction associations and labor organizations across the state united to launch this initiative.

    IWEA has worked with the KCA and partnered with the National Safety Council to provide information and access to research data that can help educate and support our organizations and our communities in this outreach to help eliminate this epidemic.

    What is Construction Opioid Awareness Week?

    An event for the construction industry to raise awareness and understand the potential dangers of prescription drug abuse.

    Why Participate?

    In 2016, more than 2,200 Pennsylvanians died of opioid overdoses, the fourth highest rate in the United States according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention.  Construction workers are involved in very physically demanding jobs and because of that many turn to medication for relief. Twenty percent of all prescribed medications to the construction industry contain an opioid in it and we feel the industry needs to be better educated on this addictive medication. 

    Who is Encouraged to Participate?

    Organizations of any size in the construction industry who are looking for an opportunity to show commitment to safety and compassion for their workers should participate.

    How to Participate?

    Participating in Construction Opioid Awareness Week is easy. Simply think about what activities you would like to do (potential ideas listed below). You can host an event for your company or open your company event to others to engage your community.

  • Opioid Awareness Toolbox Talk #1

    5 Minute Talk - Common Risks At Work From Opioid Painkiller Use

    Read the full report   Click here

  • Opioid Awareness Toolbox Talk #2

    5 Minute Talk - Discussing Prescription Opioid Painkillers With Your Doctor

    Read the full report   Click here

  • Opioid Awareness Toolbox Talk #3

    5 Minute Talk - Understanding Opioid Pain Medications - Know Your Risk

    Read the full report   Click here

  • Opioid Awareness Toolbox Talk #4

    5 Minute Talk - Your Employee Assistance Program - A Valuable Company Benefit & Resource

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    MarchElectrocutions 

    April - Struck by Object

    May - Falls

    June - Caught-in/between

    The Focus Four Hazards have accounted for the vast majority of injuries and fatalities in the construction industry. In an effort to prevent future injuries and fatalities, OSHA, our state plans, consultation projects, and construction industry partners have initiated a “Focus Four Hazards” campaign from March through June in Region Three’s jurisdiction. The goal of this campaign is to raise awareness in the recognition, evaluation, and control of these hazards through the delivery of toolbox talks for stakeholders to provide to their workers. These toolbox talks will be available during the campaign for stakeholders to use at their own discretion.

     

    Construction's "Fatal Four"

    Out of 5190* worker fatalities in private industry in calendar year 2016, 991 or 19% were in construction―that is, one in five worker deaths last year were in construction.

    The leading causes of worker deaths on construction sites were falls, followed by struck-by, electrocution, and caught-in/between. These "Fatal Four" hazards were responsible for well over half (64%) of the construction worker deaths in 2016*, according to BLS reports.

    Falls — 384 out of 991 total deaths in construction in CY 2016 (39%)

    Struck by Object - 93 (9%)

    Electrocutions - 82 (8%)

    Caught-in/between* - 72 (7%)

     

    *This category includes construction workers killed when caught-in or compressed by equipment or objects, and struck, caught, or crushed in collapsing structure, equipment, or material

    Eliminating these Four Hazards would save 631 workers' lives each year.

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 June - Caught-in/between Toolbox Talk 1

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    June - Caught-in/between

    Toolbox Talk 1 - Preventing Cave-Ins

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 June - Caught-in/between Toolbox Talk 2

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    June - Caught-in/between

    Toolbox Talk 2 - Maintenance

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 June - Caught-in/between Toolbox Talk 3

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    June - Caught-in/between

    Toolbox Talk 3 - Working Near Parts

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 June - Caught-in/between Toolbox Talk 4

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    June - Caught-in/between

    Toolbox Talk 4 - Skid Steer

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 June - Caught-in/between Toolbox Talk 5

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    June - Caught-in/between

    Toolbox Talk 5 - Working Around Cranes

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 May - Falls Toolbox Talk 1

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    May - Falls

    Toolbox Talk 1 - Aerial Lifts

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 May - Falls Toolbox Talk 2

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    May Falls

    Toolbox Talk 2 - Scaffolding

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 May - Falls Toolbox Talk 3

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    May Falls

    Toolbox Talk 3 - Skylight Holes

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 May - Falls Toolbox Talk 4

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    May Falls

    Toolbox Talk 4 - Ladders

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 May - Falls Toolbox Talk 5

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    May Falls

    Toolbox Talk 5 - Fall Protection Inspections

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 May - Falls Toolbox Talk 6

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    May Falls

    Toolbox Talk 6 - Equipment

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 May - Falls Toolbox Talk 7

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    May Falls

    Toolbox Talk 7 - General Awareness

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 April - Struck By Toolbox Talk 1

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    April Struck By

    Toolbox Talk 1

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 April - Struck By Toolbox Talk 2

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    April Struck By

    Toolbox Talk 2

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 April - Struck By Toolbox Talk 3

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    April Struck By

    Toolbox Talk 3

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 April - Struck By Toolbox Talk 4

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    April Struck By

    Toolbox Talk 4

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 April - Struck By Toolbox Talk 5

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    April Struck By

    Toolbox Talk 5

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 April - Struck By Toolbox Talk 6

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    April Struck By

    Toolbox Talk 6

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 March - Electrocutions Toolbox Talk 1

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    March - Electrocutions 

    Toolbox Talk 1

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 March - Electrocutions Toolbox Talk 2

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    March - Electrocutions 

    Toolbox Talk 2

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 March - Electrocutions Toolbox Talk 3

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    March - Electrocutions 

    Toolbox Talk 3

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 March - Electrocutions Toolbox Talk 4

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    March - Electrocutions 

    Toolbox Talk 4

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 March - Electrocutions Toolbox Talk 5

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    March - Electrocutions 

    Toolbox Talk 5

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 March - Electrocutions Toolbox Talk 6

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    March - Electrocutions 

    Toolbox Talk 6

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 March - Electrocutions Toolbox Talk 7

    OSHA Focus Four Campaign 2018 

    March - Electrocutions 

    Toolbox Talk 7

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA proposes delay for electronic submission of injury, illness reports

    OSHA has proposed a delay in he electronic reporting compliance date of the rule: Improve Tracking of Workplace injuries and Illnesses.  The compliance date was originally July 1, 2017, and it has now been delayed until Dec. 1, 2017.

     

    See the attached report.  OSHA invites public comment, so click here  for full details.

  • GUARDIAN SRL STOP USE Notification

    The Guardian Fall Protection Company has issued an IMPORTANT NOTIFICATION regarding Potential Fraying / Bird-caging of specific Self-Retracting Lifelines manufactured between January 1, 2015 through March of 2017.

    The Part Numbers Affected include:

    #10910

    #10912

    #10915

    #10920

    #10922

    #10925

    plus any Custom part that uses an Edge or Halo Cable SRL as its base model.

    Please see the attached document for instructions to examine cables and remove products from service, if necessary.

     

    http://www.iwea.org/download.php?t=document_repository&id=12

  • OSHA Conference on Crane Certification Delay

    Safety & Health

    OSHA to Propose One-Year Delay for Crane Certification

     

    Snapshot

    • Meeting set for June 20

    • Nov. 10 current certification deadline

     

    OSHA wants to delay by one year its mandate for construction crane operator certification, the agency announced June 6.

    In May, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration announced it intended to delay the Nov. 10 deadline for third-party certification of operators (29 C.F.R. Subpart CC), but didn't say how long the delay would be.

    Before OSHA can issue a rule extending the deadline, the proposal must be reviewed by the agency's Advisory Committee on Construction Safety and Health (ACCSH). During a June 20 teleconference with the committee, OSHA officials will present their proposal and hear committee and public comment on setting a new date (RIN:1218-AC96).

    Work on revising qualification requirements began during the Obama administration following complaints from contractors, crane owners and operators that certification should be based only on the type of crane, not the type and lifting capacity as the current rule requires.

    The dial-in number for the meeting is (888) 604-9368, and the passcode is 8521818.

    People interested in making presentations must make their requests by June 9. Submit requests and documents at http://www.regulations.gov, and reference Docket No. OSHA-2017-0007.

  • SAFETY ALERT - Genie Scissors Lift

    We just received the following notification from the Pittsburgh OSHA Office:

    Genie has determined that the control system utilized on Safety Lifts, Model #: GS-3232 and GS-4047 and X-14, can malfunction.  The issues and actions required are attached in the link below.  If you have these machines, please follow the corrective instructions provided.  If you have any questions, contact the Association Office.

    http://www.vppparegion2.org/single-post/2017/03/02/Genie-Safety-Notice---Control-System-Malfunction

  • Zorbit Energy Absorber Safety Alert

    "Attached is a safety alert on a Zorbit Energy Absorber which is used in conjunction with horizontal lifeline systems. If you have and use this device please review the attached Alert and be guided accordingly".

     

    Read the full report   Click here

  • National Safety STAND-DOWN announced

    OSHA and other federal agencies announce the weeklong initiative to raise awareness of preventing fall hazards in construction.

    MAY 2nd through MAY 6th, 2016 will be National Safety's STAND-DOWN Week. A Safety Stand-Down is a voluntary event for Employers to talk directly to employees about safety, focusing on Fall Hazards and reinforcing the importance of Fall Prevention.  This year's Goal is to reach 5 million workers.

    For more information on how to participate, click the link below:

    https://www.osha.gov/StopFallsStandDown/index.html

    Contractors are asked to:

    • Plan a toolbox talk or other safety activity
    • Take a break to talk about how to prevent falls
    • Provide training for all workers
  • Volvo Truck Recall Notice

    The US Department of Transportation has announced a recall on certain Volvo Trucks manufactured between May 11, 2015 and March 8, 2016.  If these vehicles have not received the repair specified by Volvo, they are to be immediately removed from service.  Click the link below  for full details and contact information from the USDOT.

    https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/out-of-service-order-volvo-trucks-safety-recall

  • OSHA New Directive for Demolition Activities

     

    MESSAGE FROM BOB CARROLL, OSHA/ Pittsburgh Office:

    Below is a link for OSHA’s New Directive for a Regional Emphasis Program for Demolition Activities.  The Directive just lists the Erie, Wilkes-Barre, and Allentown Area Offices.  This e-mail is to inform you that this Emphasis program is in effect in the Pittsburgh Area Office jurisdiction as well. 

    If you have any questions, just e-mail me (Carroll.Bob@dol.gov)  or call me at 412-395-4902.

     Click on the link below, or copy and paste it into your URL for full details.

    http://www.osha.gov/dep/leps/RegionIII/reg3_fy2016_demolition_2016-07.pdf

  • OSHA Interpretation regarding Crane & Derrick assembly/disassembly

    Regarding Standard 1926.1403-1926.1406

    This response was given on October 15, 2014

    Read the full report   Click here

  • It's the LAW! Poster unveiled

    To help ensure that workers have a "voice" in their workplaces and the protection they deserve, OSHA unveiled a new version of their "It's the Law" poster.  The Poster is uploaded here, and can be downloaded from our site, or directly from the OSHA site.  Please post these at your worksites, and be aware that legal size paper (8-1/2 x 14") is the smallest size approved for display.

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Recordkeeping Rule update that you need to know about!

    OSHA has updated the recordkeeping rule regarding reporting Fatalities and Severe injuries and has expanded the list of severe injuries that must be reported.

    The new reporting requirements go into effect on January 1, 2015 - so be sure your Project Managers, Field Supervisors and all Staff is aware of these changes.

    The OSHA Fact Sheet, with full details, is attached.  You may also want to visit the OSHA link for additional information, at: www.osha.gov/recordkeeping2014

     

    Read the full report   Click here

  • OSHA Interpretation December 2013

    Fall Protection for walk/work along bridge decks with a 32 inch high barrier wall

    Based on a question asked by a contractor in Florida, OSHA responded to appropriate safety measures to protect workers along bridge decks.  

    Read the Q & A here.

  • A Temporary Enforcement Policy for Cranes & Derricks goes into effect on July 26, 2012.

    Full details are attached.

    https://www.osha.gov/cranes-derricks/ProximityAlarm_InsulatingLink.html

  • OSHA Clarification on double connections at beams not framing into columns

    http://www.iwea.org/download.php?t=document_repository&id=5

    OSHA RELEASE/ MARCH 2010
    Painting or placement of adhesive stckers on a protective helmet shell.

    Read the full report Click Here

  • CURRENT OSHA NEWS TRADE RELEASE

    Oct. 1, 2009
    Contact: Office of Communications
    Phone: 202-693-1999

    OSHA News Release - Table of Contents

    OSHA revises enforcement policies for fall protection during steel erection

    WASHINGTON - The Occupational Safety and Health Administration recently revised the steel erection compliance directive for the agency's Steel Erection Standard to change two enforcement policies related to tripping hazards and installation of nets or floors during steel erection.

    One of the revised policies addresses the standard's requirement that employers install a floor or net within two stories or 30 feet, whichever is less.

    The other policy states that employers must comply with the requirement that steel studs, known as shear connectors, be installed at the worksite. Shear connectors bind concrete to the steel.

    "Falls are the leading cause of death among construction workers," said acting Assistant Secretary of Labor for OSHA Jordan Barab. "We are intent on reducing the number of injuries and fatalities in the construction industry and believe these policy revisions will help us attain that goal."

    Bureau of Labor Statistics 2007 data show that 1,204 fatalities occurred in the construction industry, 447 of which resulted from falls. The steel erection standard sets forth requirements to protect workers from the hazards associated with steel erection activities when constructing, altering, and repairing single and multi-story buildings, bridges, and other structures where steel erection occurs.

    Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, OSHA's role is to promote safe and healthful working conditions for America's men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, outreach and education. For additional information or more detail, please visit www.osha.gov.